TJ DeVlieger & Seibold – Where the Sun Shines

TJ DeVlieger & Seibold – Where the Sun Shines

TJ DeVlieger protects his clients in the Sunshine State. The first time we met TJ was at this year’s FSPA conference in Orlando. TJ is not athletic, he’s an athlete. There’s a difference. Athletes compete. That’s TJ. Athletes like TJ know there is no “bottom line” but a consistent work ethic, doing the right things day in and day out to compete and win. We’ve been working with TJ and his teammates at Seibold for some time now and can attest to their group’s attention to detail, persistence, perseverance and dedication to serving and protecting their clients.

PHL EDU CU 8-16-16

Seibold, Inc. serves their commercial, cultural, educational, and financial services clients with Florida, upstate New York, Virginia, District of Columbia,Pennsylvania, and Indiana.

 

For Customers Who Have Everything, and Bring It With Them!

We get it. Some folks travel light, and some, not so much. For those of you who serve patrons or customers that like to, or need to, carry a lot of stuff or packages, the Atlas Pivot Table is as aesthetic as it is strong. Watch the video to see the Corian table’s surface and stainless steel, rod construction support more than 50lbs, yet lift out of the way with your pinkie finger. Yep, 50lbs is a lot of weight; but your customers will thankful you made the choice.

 

 

OptiVia & Isotec Begin Partnership

OptiVia & Isotec Begin Partnership

OptiVia Solutions, a wholly owned subsidiary of Loth, Inc., has become Isotec’s newest distributor. Isotec is excited to be working with OptiVia, as they can service all aspects of a client’s building needs. From initial consultation to the final ribbon cutting, they’ll serve as a trusted partner. OptiVia is scalable to handle any size project while remaining agile to ensure personal attention. OptiVia’s focus and experience in the financial arena empowers the OptiVia/Isotec partnership to provide insight for advising on safety and security.

OptiVia will market and promote Isotec’s full line of DHS Designated Safety Entrances® and Access Control products.

 

 

 

Robbery Risk and Prior Victimization

Because bank robbery is not a common crime, it may appear random, which suggests that all banks are at a high risk of robbery. In the short-term, however, the vast majority of branches do not get robbed. As an example over a 1 year period 14 percent of branches in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania were robbed.

As the time period increases, however, more branches are victimized: in two years, 31 percent of branches in Washington, D.C. were robbed; in five years, percent of branches in California were robbed; and in 10 years, 52 percent of branches in Washington, D.C. were robbed.

The increasing percentage of robbed branches levels off over time: after 10 years, nearly half of all bank branches will not have been robbed, while branches that have been robbed once are often robbed again—a phenomenon known as repeat victimization.

Because robbed branches are often robbed again, these contribute disproportionately to the number of bank robberies.

  • In Seattle, Washington, 63 percent of robbed branches were victimized two or more times; these generated 82 percent of all robberies during a four and one-half year period.
  • In Washington, D.C., 12 percent of branches were robbed five or more times in 10 years; these branches generated more than one-third of all bank robberies during this period.
  • Robbed branches are distinctly different from unrobbed branches in their future victimization risk. A branch that has never been robbed faces a low risk of robbery, whereas a robbed branch has a substantially higher risk. In Indiana, for example, robbed branches were three times more likely to be robbed in the succeeding three years than unrobbed branches. A branch that has been robbed multiple times faces the highest risk of all.
  • Repeat robberies may be committed by a robber who returns to reprise a successful crime or to complete an attempted crime. A repeat robbery is particularly likely if the robber felt the crime was easy; many offenders describe bank robberies this way.
  • The pattern of repeat victimization is so strong that not all repeat robberies can be attributed to repeat offenders. Repeat robberies also occur because the features that attracted an initial robber—such as an easy escape route that remains unchanged—are likely to attract other like-minded robbers. Some believe that publicity about successful bank robberies attracts copycats, but there is no evidence that this is so.
  • Studies show that the risk of repeat victimization is most acute in the short-term: at least one-third of repeat bank robberies occur within two months of a previous offense. Because bank robberies are a low volume crime, multi-year data is often necessary to identify such patterns. Repeat victimization continues over longer periods of time; these patterns can best be identified when robbed and unrobbed banks are compared. The risk of repeat victimization is so strong that robbed banks are often surrounded by unrobbed banks.

Compliant Victims

Factors contributing to bank robberies can largely be explained by three factors.

  1. More bank outlets and extended hours increase opportunities for robberies.
  2. Banks remain the most lucrative of all robbery targets; moreover, 80 percent of stolen money is never recovered.
  3. Bank robberies are usually fast, low risk crimes, because employees are trained to comply with a robber’s demands. Moreover, although the risk of arrest is high, much of this risk is short term, and risk – as reflected by clearances – has declined over time.

Increased Opportunity

Much of the growth in the number of bank outlets is attributable to the explosion of mini-branches—also known as in-store branches—in retail grocery stores and big-box retailers such as Wal-Mart. The increase in in-store branches is predominately an urban phenomenon. In-store branches less expensive to open and to operate than traditional branches, and banks can capitalize on exclusive agreements with particular retailers to rapidly increase the number of outlets. Because profit underlies bank expansion efforts, the number of branches within any jurisdiction can substantially expand or contract over time.

Once well-known for “banker’s hours”—referring to a short working day— many branches now have extended operating hours. To attract customers, virtually all in-store branches remain open into the evening hours during the week, operate a full day on Saturday, and may offer Sunday hours as well. The increase in operating hours effectively increases bank exposure to robbery by at least 25 percent. As banks have become more convenient for their customers, they have also become more convenient for robbers.

Lucrative Rewards

Although many banks limit the amount of cash on hand and control access to it within the branch, banks nevertheless remain a source of easy cash for robbers. In fact, banks are the most lucrative commercial robbery targets. In the United Kingdom, banks suffer the highest average losses from armed robberies. In the United States, bank robbers net just over $4,000 per robbery; this represents about 60 percent of financial losses from commercial robberies, despite the fact that bank robberies comprise less than 10 percent of the total for this crime type.

Although the average take hardly seems worth the punishment, interviews indicate that most robbers would be satisfied with much less. In addition, although many bank robbers are eventually apprehended, the stolen money usually is not: only 20 percent of money taken in bank robberies is ever recovered.

Low Risk

For a robber, there are three main reasons why bank branches may be considered predictable and relatively low-risk targets.

  1. Branches have standardized designs and predictable layouts and operations.
  2. Bank employees are unarmed and consistently compliant. Even robbery transactions are handled quickly and efficiently.
  3. Employee characteristics affect a robber’s perception of compliance; tellers are often young and predominantly female, whereas robbers are predominantly male.

Predictable Design

Banks have highly uniform business practices and interior designs. Branches have a predictable physical footprint that features a centralized entry and a group of chest-high teller windows arrayed in close proximity to the entrance. Although such uniformity may help customers feel comfortable banking in any branch, it also provides great predictability for robbers.

Compliant Victims

During a robbery, bank practices are highly standardized; consequently, robbers know that they can count on compliant victims. Most banks—consistent with police advice—direct employees to comply quickly with robbers’ demands. Tellers willingly empty their cash drawers when presented with a simple robbery demand note, whether or not violence is threatened or a weapon is displayed. The bank’s primary objective is to protect the safety and security of its employees and customers by reducing the likelihood of violence. Consequently, the risk that a robber will encounter resistance is extremely low.

Bank employees are so compliant that the robbery itself is a quick and efficient transaction; more than two-thirds of bank robberies are completed in three minutes or less. Robbers often wait in the teller’s line with legitimate customers and pass a demand note to the teller. In many robberies, the event is handled so discreetly that other customers and even other employees are not even aware that a crime has occurred until after the robber has left the premises.

Ambush Attackers

Bank robbers are predators that rely on their ability to stalk, and ambush your employees and patrons. It is crucial to deny these ambush attackers access to your employees and patrons; the opportunities to stalk them, and to cause them harm.

Call today. Isotec Safety Entrances can protect your employees and patrons. 303.800.3344