ISIL Claims Responsibility For Attack On Belgian Police Officers

ISIL has claimed responsibility for Saturday’s machete attack during which two police officers were severely wounded at a security checkpoint in Charleroi, Belgium, the New York Times  (8/7, Breeden) reports. According to a statement issued Sunday by ISIL’s Amaq News Agency, a “soldier of the Islamic State” carried out the attack “in response to calls to target citizens of countries belonging to the crusader coalition.” The Wall Street Journal  (8/7, A1, Norman) reports that Belgian authorities, who have opened a terrorism investigation into the assault, said the attacker, who was shot by police and later died, has been identified as a 33-year-old Algerian who had been living in the country since 2012.

Federal Appeals Court Permits Law Enforcement To Use Exigent Circumstances To Obtain Suspect’s GPS Location

August 1, 2016: The Wall Street Journal reported that a federal appeals court in New York ruled law enforcement was permitted to use the “exigent circumstances” exception to the warrant requirement to obtain the GPS locations of a suspected killer. The court ruled police were legally permitted to ping the suspect’s cellphone when he was identified as possibly being involved in a murder. Law enforcement declined to obtain a warrant in fear of the safety of the undercover officers and informants who were investigating the suspect.

Isotec Provides Access Control for US Air Force

Isotec Provides Access Control for US Air Force

Isotec Security is a preferred supplier to the US Air Force, under its GSA contract (GS-07F-040BA). Isotec is delivering multiple access control systems to the Air Force this week and throughout the third quarter to help protect and keep safe personnel and the strategic assets they protect. Chief Technical Officer Paul Labarile is Isotec’s liaison to prime contractors serving government agencies. Himself a military veteran, Mr. Labarile commented that “We answer the call when asked, and that’s what the US Air Force appreciates most. It’s an honor to serve.”

“We test everything” says Production Manager Isaac Madrid while conducting mandatory assembly and Factory Acceptance Testing before the portal is delivered to the Air Force for installation. Isotec also follows our work and we’ll be on hand for installation supervision, Site Acceptance Testing, and operator training to insure the technology performs as specified.

 

Department of Homeland Security Video

Department of Homeland Security Video

Take 3 minutes to listen to Bruce Davidson from Homeland Security and security professionals on the importance of SAFETY Act approved products. Isotec Security is in the anti-terrorism business. We know that offering SAFETY Act approved products removes the guesswork for our clients. They know the process and product standards set forth by Homeland Security reduce their liabilities while keeping safe and protecting what matters most. They understand that acts terrorism are rising and their countermeasures to prevent terrorism and violent crimes must prevail. Whether your facility is an airport, courthouse, hospital, place of business, or a strategic site, Isotec Security has SAFETY Act approved products that will keep safe and to protect what matters to you.

 

 

OptiVia & Isotec Begin Partnership

OptiVia & Isotec Begin Partnership

OptiVia Solutions, a wholly owned subsidiary of Loth, Inc., has become Isotec’s newest distributor. Isotec is excited to be working with OptiVia, as they can service all aspects of a client’s building needs. From initial consultation to the final ribbon cutting, they’ll serve as a trusted partner. OptiVia is scalable to handle any size project while remaining agile to ensure personal attention. OptiVia’s focus and experience in the financial arena empowers the OptiVia/Isotec partnership to provide insight for advising on safety and security.

OptiVia will market and promote Isotec’s full line of DHS Designated Safety Entrances® and Access Control products.

 

 

 

Bill Weimer of Advent Automation

Bill Weimer of Advent Automation

Bill Weimer has been recommending Isotec’s products to his clients for 17 years. The longevity of his relationships with his clients speaks volumes to his professional commitment; not only to his clients, but to their patrons as well. Bill’s clients trust his judgment, because they know he cares for their safety, and he delivers on his commitments. He makes success look easy, but he knows otherwise. He believes that “character counts” and doing his utmost to protect his clients is his highest responsibility. Below are photos of just a few of the many successful installations he’s completed. Advent Automation is headquartered in Annapolis Junction, MD. “Advent” provides security & financial products and services for financial services companies, and government agencies in selective Mid-Atlantic states.                        TREMENDOUS WORK BILL!

Aesthetics & Fortitude - Courtesy of Bill Weimer & Advent Automation     Interior   DHS Designated QATT IV Banner Candidate

 

 

Robbery Risk and Prior Victimization

Because bank robbery is not a common crime, it may appear random, which suggests that all banks are at a high risk of robbery. In the short-term, however, the vast majority of branches do not get robbed. As an example over a 1 year period 14 percent of branches in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania were robbed.

As the time period increases, however, more branches are victimized: in two years, 31 percent of branches in Washington, D.C. were robbed; in five years, percent of branches in California were robbed; and in 10 years, 52 percent of branches in Washington, D.C. were robbed.

The increasing percentage of robbed branches levels off over time: after 10 years, nearly half of all bank branches will not have been robbed, while branches that have been robbed once are often robbed again—a phenomenon known as repeat victimization.

Because robbed branches are often robbed again, these contribute disproportionately to the number of bank robberies.

  • In Seattle, Washington, 63 percent of robbed branches were victimized two or more times; these generated 82 percent of all robberies during a four and one-half year period.
  • In Washington, D.C., 12 percent of branches were robbed five or more times in 10 years; these branches generated more than one-third of all bank robberies during this period.
  • Robbed branches are distinctly different from unrobbed branches in their future victimization risk. A branch that has never been robbed faces a low risk of robbery, whereas a robbed branch has a substantially higher risk. In Indiana, for example, robbed branches were three times more likely to be robbed in the succeeding three years than unrobbed branches. A branch that has been robbed multiple times faces the highest risk of all.
  • Repeat robberies may be committed by a robber who returns to reprise a successful crime or to complete an attempted crime. A repeat robbery is particularly likely if the robber felt the crime was easy; many offenders describe bank robberies this way.
  • The pattern of repeat victimization is so strong that not all repeat robberies can be attributed to repeat offenders. Repeat robberies also occur because the features that attracted an initial robber—such as an easy escape route that remains unchanged—are likely to attract other like-minded robbers. Some believe that publicity about successful bank robberies attracts copycats, but there is no evidence that this is so.
  • Studies show that the risk of repeat victimization is most acute in the short-term: at least one-third of repeat bank robberies occur within two months of a previous offense. Because bank robberies are a low volume crime, multi-year data is often necessary to identify such patterns. Repeat victimization continues over longer periods of time; these patterns can best be identified when robbed and unrobbed banks are compared. The risk of repeat victimization is so strong that robbed banks are often surrounded by unrobbed banks.

Know the Risk – Raise Your Shield: Travel Awareness

 Office of the Director of National Intelligence

Data breaches compromising personal information result in a broad range of risks to individuals. This includes identity theft, targeting of individuals with knowledge of sensitive government information and internal business processes, and other intelligence activities that use the personal information of U.S. citizens to undermine national security.

The following information is provided to help you understand how your personal information may be used by foreign intelligence services and their proxies, extremists, criminals, hackers, and other bad actors (“bad actors”); what actions to take to limit the risk of your information being exploited; and warning signs that you are being targeted.

Copy the link below to Federal Radio and paste to your browser. It will take you to a very informative and professional presentation on how to protect yourself and your confidential information when travelling. The video is sponsored by the National Counterintelligence and Security Center.

http://federalnewsradio.com/technology/2016/06/what-security-risks-do-travelers-face-abroad/slide/1/

 

 

Compliant Victims

Factors contributing to bank robberies can largely be explained by three factors.

  1. More bank outlets and extended hours increase opportunities for robberies.
  2. Banks remain the most lucrative of all robbery targets; moreover, 80 percent of stolen money is never recovered.
  3. Bank robberies are usually fast, low risk crimes, because employees are trained to comply with a robber’s demands. Moreover, although the risk of arrest is high, much of this risk is short term, and risk – as reflected by clearances – has declined over time.

Increased Opportunity

Much of the growth in the number of bank outlets is attributable to the explosion of mini-branches—also known as in-store branches—in retail grocery stores and big-box retailers such as Wal-Mart. The increase in in-store branches is predominately an urban phenomenon. In-store branches less expensive to open and to operate than traditional branches, and banks can capitalize on exclusive agreements with particular retailers to rapidly increase the number of outlets. Because profit underlies bank expansion efforts, the number of branches within any jurisdiction can substantially expand or contract over time.

Once well-known for “banker’s hours”—referring to a short working day— many branches now have extended operating hours. To attract customers, virtually all in-store branches remain open into the evening hours during the week, operate a full day on Saturday, and may offer Sunday hours as well. The increase in operating hours effectively increases bank exposure to robbery by at least 25 percent. As banks have become more convenient for their customers, they have also become more convenient for robbers.

Lucrative Rewards

Although many banks limit the amount of cash on hand and control access to it within the branch, banks nevertheless remain a source of easy cash for robbers. In fact, banks are the most lucrative commercial robbery targets. In the United Kingdom, banks suffer the highest average losses from armed robberies. In the United States, bank robbers net just over $4,000 per robbery; this represents about 60 percent of financial losses from commercial robberies, despite the fact that bank robberies comprise less than 10 percent of the total for this crime type.

Although the average take hardly seems worth the punishment, interviews indicate that most robbers would be satisfied with much less. In addition, although many bank robbers are eventually apprehended, the stolen money usually is not: only 20 percent of money taken in bank robberies is ever recovered.

Low Risk

For a robber, there are three main reasons why bank branches may be considered predictable and relatively low-risk targets.

  1. Branches have standardized designs and predictable layouts and operations.
  2. Bank employees are unarmed and consistently compliant. Even robbery transactions are handled quickly and efficiently.
  3. Employee characteristics affect a robber’s perception of compliance; tellers are often young and predominantly female, whereas robbers are predominantly male.

Predictable Design

Banks have highly uniform business practices and interior designs. Branches have a predictable physical footprint that features a centralized entry and a group of chest-high teller windows arrayed in close proximity to the entrance. Although such uniformity may help customers feel comfortable banking in any branch, it also provides great predictability for robbers.

Compliant Victims

During a robbery, bank practices are highly standardized; consequently, robbers know that they can count on compliant victims. Most banks—consistent with police advice—direct employees to comply quickly with robbers’ demands. Tellers willingly empty their cash drawers when presented with a simple robbery demand note, whether or not violence is threatened or a weapon is displayed. The bank’s primary objective is to protect the safety and security of its employees and customers by reducing the likelihood of violence. Consequently, the risk that a robber will encounter resistance is extremely low.

Bank employees are so compliant that the robbery itself is a quick and efficient transaction; more than two-thirds of bank robberies are completed in three minutes or less. Robbers often wait in the teller’s line with legitimate customers and pass a demand note to the teller. In many robberies, the event is handled so discreetly that other customers and even other employees are not even aware that a crime has occurred until after the robber has left the premises.

Ambush Attackers

Bank robbers are predators that rely on their ability to stalk, and ambush your employees and patrons. It is crucial to deny these ambush attackers access to your employees and patrons; the opportunities to stalk them, and to cause them harm.

Call today. Isotec Safety Entrances can protect your employees and patrons. 303.800.3344